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The Land Investor

News and Commentary on Land-based Investment

50 Years Later: The Wilderness Act Impact on the U.S. Rural West Economy

By John Watson/Fay Ranches: Following is an interesting article from today’s WyoFile, reflecting on the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act written by Ray Rasker, Director of Headwaters Economics based out of Bozeman, Montana.  The article points to a direct association between Wilderness, national parks and other protected lands and economic well-being that has led to the discovery and redevelopment of certain non-metropolitan western counties.

The article refers to “sweet spots” in the rural west with a particularly positive association between protected lands and economic well-being.  These are the “connected” counties with a rural, scenic setting and with a nearby airport with daily service to major cities.  These places include Jackson, WY; Bend OR; Bozeman, MT; Durango, CO; Flagstaff, AZ – places that have been discovered and redeveloped because of quality landscape amenities, lifestyle and business environment.  Businesses in these sweet spots are recruiting talented employees by
promoting access to nearby public lands.

Cites Rasker, “Increasingly entrepreneurs are basing their business location decisions on the quality of life in an area.  Businesses are recruiting talented employees by promoting access to nearby, beautiful public lands.  This is happening in western cities and rural areas alike.”  Communities with protected natural amenities have an advantage in attracting professionals and service industries.

Rasker mentions that protected landscapes by themselves are not enough to create job growth.  The remote rural areas that lack transportation access to markets, good schools and advanced medical facilities have lagged compared to the more connected markets.

Wilderness at 50: Understanding its role in today’s economy

The Ferris Mountains wilderness study area in south-central Wyoming. Headwaters Economics says communities connected to wild areas draw critical economic development. (photo courtesy of U.S. Bureau of Land Management — click to enlarge)

At the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, it is encouraging to learn that lands set aside for conservation can also have tremendous economic value. Wild places are key to attracting entrepreneurs, as well as a tidal wave of retiring Baby Boomers. And, more obviously, wild places create jobs in outdoor recreation, now a $646 billion industry.

Simply put, people care about quality landscapes and it influences where they live, play, and do business.

A number of studies bear this out. For example, non-metro western counties have, on average, a per capita income $4,360 higher for every 100,000 acres of protected public lands.

But a question for today’s policy makers remains: will the protection of wild places on public lands — in the form of Wilderness, national parks, wildlife refuges, and national monuments — automatically lead to economic well-being?

The answer depends largely on location. In big cities, the effect of protected lands is difficult to measure because these economies are too complex to measure the effect of one variable. In remote rural counties there is a positive association, yet there is little job growth because beautiful landscapes by themselves are not enough; good schools, medical facilities, and access to markets also are needed.

The sweet spot are counties with a rural, scenic setting and with a nearby airport with daily service to major cities. In these “connected” counties there is a measurable positive association between Wilderness, national parks and other protected lands and economic well-being.

These places include Jackson, Wyoming; Bend, Oregon; Bozeman, Montana; Durango; Colorado; Flagstaff, Arizona and others like them — places that in the last few decades have been discovered and redeveloped because they are wonderful places to live and do business.

Since 1970 the vast majority of new jobs has been created in service industries, and the race is on to capture the high-wage component of this growth. Communities with protected public lands have a competitive advantage in attracting the engineers, architects, software developers, doctors, lawyers, researchers, and others.

More than 100 economists, including three Nobel laureates, sent a letter to President Obama to ask for increased protection of public lands. They stated the situation like this: “Increasingly, entrepreneurs are basing their business location decisions on the quality of life in an area. Businesses are recruiting talented employees by promoting access to beautiful, nearby public lands. This is happening in western cities and rural areas alike.”

In addition, the big trend to watch is the retiring Baby Boomers. Their investment, retirement and other age-related payments now account
for 41 percent of personal income among counties in the West, and 60 percent of net new personal income in the last decade. This money in turn stimulates health care, construction, and other sectors. According to USDA’s Economic Research Service, members of this so-called Baby Boomer tsunami consistently migrate to counties with high natural amenities.

Americans clearly care about quality landscapes. A survey from earlier this year found that “69 percent of Westerners are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports protections for some public lands.”

While the economic role of protected lands is not the same in all places, 50 years after the first federal Wilderness, protected lands still matter and play an important economic role.

 

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